Livestock

Beefed up over China

by
November 09, 2017

Federal Member for Murray Damian Drum said news of China lifting an import ban on Australian beef would provide beef producers with more options to sell.

Federal Member for Murray Damian Drum said news of China lifting an import ban on Australian beef would provide beef producers with more options to sell.

China’s quarantine agency imposed the ban in late July after discovering labels on some boxes of exported beef did not match packet labels inside.

Mr Drum said the horticulture industry was a good example to see the benefits of free-trade agreements.

‘‘You only have to look across the horticulture industry to see the benefits of free trade agreements,’’ Mr Drum said.

‘‘There will be a substantial increase in the demand for our beef.

‘‘I think you’ll find, if people were supplying big supermarkets, this provides another option.

‘‘Farmers and station agents will have multiple options to sell their produce, too.

‘‘This will flow down to the farmer quickly and abattoirs might be able to set prices, rather be price takers.’’

Federal Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said it was very good news, given the beef export industry was worth about $670million to the Australian economy each year.

‘‘There were some issues regarding labelling regulations that have now been resolved very quickly,’’ she told reporters in Perth on Tuesday.

‘‘Given the strength of the trading relationship between Australia and China — of course China is our largest trading partner — and the fact that we have a high quality, comprehensive free trade agreement between our two countries, it’s very pleasing that this matter has been resolved.’’

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