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Call to extend roo cull trial

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January 31, 2018

A trial allowing legally harvested kangaroo carcases to be salvaged for pet food is due to expire in March and Member for Euroa Steph Ryan is pushing the Victorian Government to extend the scheme across regional Victoria and make it permanent.

A trial allowing legally harvested kangaroo carcases to be salvaged for pet food is due to expire in March and Member for Euroa Steph Ryan is pushing the Victorian Government to extend the scheme across regional Victoria and make it permanent.

Ms Ryan said kangaroos were wreaking havoc on Victoria’s roads and not enough was being done to ensure the state’s kangaroo population was managed in a sustainable way.

‘‘The Coalition’s Kangaroo Pet Food Trial is a practical measure to address Victoria’s kangaroo problem,’’ Ms Ryan said.

‘‘It reduces waste, allows carcases to be repurposed and creates employment, but it is soon due to expire.

‘‘There have been 797 collisions with animals resulting in injury or fatality in Victoria over the last five years, according to VicRoads crash data.

‘‘This figure does not include the huge number of smaller prangs which have resulted in damage to vehicles, inconvenience to drivers and costly repair works, or the frightening near misses most of us have encountered.

‘‘The overwhelming feedback I am receiving from my constituents is that kangaroo numbers are out of control, they are making our roads dangerous and more needs to be done,’’ Ms Ryan said.

‘‘Extending this scheme across all regional local government areas in Victoria and making it permanent is one step the government should be taking.’’

Seymour resident Andrea McKenzie, who regularly travels along Hume Fwy to Kilmore for work, knows only too well what an encounter with a kangaroo on the road can mean.

Ms McKenzie said she was lucky to escape with only minor physical injuries after her vehicle collided with a kangaroo on her way to work one morning, but was shaken by the incident.

‘‘As a frequent driver along this road, I see hundreds of kangaroos at all times of the day,’’ Ms McKenzie said.

‘‘Many of these are roadkill, meaning that other drivers have ended up in the same unfortunate situation as me, hitting the kangaroo, damaging their car and being out of pocket due to vehicle repairs and possible time away from work.

‘‘I’m sure some people have endured more serious injuries than myself.’’

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