Livestock

Combination drench best bet

by
February 15, 2018

Livestock health experts are warning of the growth of triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms in the lead-up to sheep drenching.

Livestock health experts are warning of the growth of triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms in the lead-up to sheep drenching.

Virbac Australia said drench resistance cost the Australian sheep and wool industry millions of dollars from lost production and associated costs each year and some sheep farmers continued to use outdated drench technology on their farms.

Virbac Australia sheep product manager Terrance Loughlin said most older drenches relied on a single drench group or a combination of drench groups and did not always kill triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms — making it historically very difficult to eradicate them.

‘‘That’s because when farmers use a drench that doesn’t kill triple-resistant worms, over time they’re actually increasing the proportion of those resistant worms on their property,’’ he said.

‘‘Not only do certain combination drenches provide a better worm kill rate, but they can also substantially reduce the proliferation of drench-resistant species. The chance of a worm having genes resistant to a drench containing three active ingredients is much lower than being resistant to just one.

‘‘This leaves fewer resistant worms to reproduce, reducing any further development of resistance.’’

Virbac has launched a new class of combination oral sheep drench incorporating micellar technology for improved efficacy that will revolutionise the worm control market.

Tridectin is the only broad-spectrum combination drench with a registered claim to kill triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms.

With 14 days’ persistent activity against moxidectin-sensitive strains of barber’s pole worm and small brown stomach worm, and with a shorter-than-usual export slaughter interval (ESI) of just 17 days — 11 days shorter than other combination drenches — Tridectin delays drench-resistance, and stops worms from coming back.

‘‘A shorter ESI means that sheep can go to slaughter sooner, and greater persistency after drenching helps to break the worm cycle for cleaner pastures and healthier overall conditions. That makes this new product an essential part of any sheep producer program,’’ Mr Loughlin said.

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